Pro Romanis Art

Apollo God of music

FINE ART REPRODUCTION

Dimensions:
16″ W x 24″ H (40.64 cm W x 60.96 cm H)
Price: $80 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-16Wx24H-Sepia

16″ W x 24″ H (40.64 cm W x 60.96 cm H)
Price: $80 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-16Wx24H-B&W

20″ W x 30″ H (50.80 cm W x 76.20 cm H)
Price: $100 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-20Wx30H-Sepia

20″ W x 30″ H (50.80 cm W x 76.20 cm H)
Price: $100 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-20Wx30H-B&W

24″ W x 36″H (60.96 cm W x 91.44 cm H)
Price: $125 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-24Wx36H-Sepia

24″ W x 36″ H (60.96 cm W x 91.44 cm H)
Price: $125 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 01000-24Wx36H-B&W

Paper: Canon Heavy Fine Art. Shipped in a sturdy mailing tube to ensure maximum protection.

Usually ships within 4-to-5 days.

Ships from and sold by Pro Romanis Arts.

Original artwork high-resolution scan printed on high quality large format printer (at least 300 dpi) on high quality paper.

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Apollo God of music

Photo & Computer Graphics Fine Art Reproduction

Description

This sculpture falls into a type called the Apollo Citharoedus, which simply means Apollo with a Cithara (a musical instrument). This example is by an unknown sculptor from the 1st century AD. It’s probably a copy of a Hellenistic original. It was extensively restored in 17th century by the Italian sculptor Ippolito Buzzi. The sculpture can be found at the Roman National Museum, Palazzo Altemps. It was photographed by Craig Phares. The columns and lintel were created digitally by Sebastian Michalski. The two images were digitally assembled into an integrated whole by JS Konrad.

Apollo

The Olympian sun god, Apollo was also the god of archery, the arts, healing, herds and flocks, knowledge, light, music, oracles, poetry and reason. Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto, the twin of Artemis, the virgin huntress, and the father of Asclepius, the god of medicine and healing. He was seen as protector of the young. Apollo, along with his sister, was the inventor of the bow. His arrows could spread disease and plague (Iliad, Book 1). Apollo was the patron of music, dance and poetry. He was seen as the leader of the muses, the inventor of string music along with the cithara and lyre. Originally a god of agriculture and animal husbandry— protector of corn and of flocks and herds—Apollo was later identified by the Greeks with the sun god Helios. The Romans, however, didn’t associate Apollo with the sun until the 1st century AD. Nietzsche in his Birth of Tragedy juxtaposed two principles in Greek art, the Apollonian and the Dionysian, the union of which gave birth to tragedy. Both were necessary and each was indispensable to the other. The Dionysian is a wild, violent, emotional force. It must be experienced, “felt”, up close in order to be appreciated. The Apollonian is a detached, distant, reasoning force. It is evaluative and may be deployed from afar.

The Artists: Craig Phares, Sebastian Michalski, JS Konrad

Craig took this picture for Pro Romanis in the Vatican museum
several years ago on a photographic expedition to Rome. Craig
Phares is a photographer, artist, designer, and programmer. He
built his first game on a TI-85 calculator when he should have been
doing math homework, and has never stopped, creating numerous
jaw-dropping digital masterpieces for the web, desktop, and
mobile devices. Craig studied sculpture at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, while constantly improving his design and programming skills on his own time. He went on to work for several advertising agencies, finally leaving to form his own company. Craig is the founder of Six Overground, a progressive digital agency focused on building full-scale digital platforms. His company has produced award-winning work for major brands and corporations including Citigroup, Estée Lauder, Havaianas HBO, Johnson & Johnson, Mars, NFL,U.S. Air Force, and USDA. When he’s not glued to a computer monitor, you’ll find
him in the real world, dreaming up the next big thing. To learn
more about Craig, visit his website at  sixoverground.com/about/

Sebastian Michalski, is an econometrician with degrees from the
University of Warsaw. He is also a designer and builder of high-
end computers with a strong interest in architecture, programming
and graphic arts. He is the developer of many of the Pro Romanis
architectural visuals as well as a programmer and web designer of
the Pro Romanis web site.

JS Konrad is a writer. He is an avid student of ancient Roman
history and culture. He also dabbles in graphic design. He is the
motive force behind the conception and development of Pro
Romanis

About The Photographer, Craig Phares

Craig took this picture for Pro Romanis several years ago on a photographic expedition to Rome. Craig Phares is a photographer, artist, designer, and programmer. He built his first game on a TI-85 calculator when he should have been doing math homework, and has never stopped, creating numerous jaw-dropping digital masterpieces for the web, desktop, and mobile devices. Craig studied sculpture at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University, while constantly improving his design and programming skills on his own time. He went on to work for several advertising agencies, finally leaving to form his own company. Craig is the founder of Six Overground, a progressive digital agency focused on building full-scale digital platforms. His company has produced award-winning work for major brands and corporations including Citigroup, Estée Lauder, Havaianas HBO, Johnson & Johnson, Mars, NFL, U.S. Air Force, and USDA. When he’s not glued to a computer monitor, you’ll find him in the real world, dreaming up the next big thing. To learn more about Craig, visit his website at http://sixoverground.com/about/.

About The Artist, JS Konrad

JS Konrad is a writer. He is an avid student of ancient Roman history and culture. He also dabbles in graphic design. He is the motive force behind the conception and development of Pro Romanis.