Pro Romanis Art

Marcus Tullius Cicero

FINE ART REPRODUCTION

Dimensions:
16″ W x 24″ H (40.64 cm W x 60.96 cm H)
Price: $80 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-16Wx24H-Sepia

16″ W x 24″ H (40.64 cm W x 60.96 cm H)
Price: $80 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-16Wx24H-B&W

20″ W x 30″ H (50.80 cm W x 76.20 cm H)
Price: $100 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-20Wx30H-Sepia

20″ W x 30″ H (50.80 cm W x 76.20 cm H)
Price: $100 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-20Wx30H-B&W

24″ W x 36″H (60.96 cm W x 91.44 cm H)
Price: $125 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-24Wx36H-Sepia

24″ W x 36″ H (60.96 cm W x 91.44 cm H)
Price: $125 US; includes shipping & handling
Product Number: 02300-24Wx36H-B&W

Paper: Canon Heavy Fine Art. Shipped in a sturdy mailing tube to ensure maximum protection.

Usually ships within 4-to-5 days.

Ships from and sold by Pro Romanis Arts.

Original artwork high-resolution scan printed on high quality large format printer (at least 300 dpi) on high quality paper.

Paper: Canon Heavy Fine Art. Shipped in a sturdy mailing tube to ensure maximum protection.

Usually ships within 4-to-5 days.

Ships from and sold by Pro Romanis Arts.

Original artwork high-resolution scan printed on high quality large format printer (at least 300 dpi) on high quality paper.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Charcoal Fine Art Reproduction

This charcoal drawing is based on a bust located in the Hall
of Philosophers in the Capitoline Museum, Rome. This bust is
dated to the first half of the 1st century AD, the time of the
Principate. It is probably a copy of a copy of an original. The
bust feels like it’s of the Veristic school (Roman realistic
portraiture) of sculpture. However, it also has some of the
idealizing elements associated with Augustan sculpture.

Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero was born in 106 BC in Arpinum, (modern-day Arpino) Italy. He belonged to a wealthy and prominent municipal family of the Ordo Equites. He received an elite education. Cicero was an industrious individual, rising early in the morning and working throughout the day. He was a prolific writer. We know him mostly through his correspondence with his close friend Atticus and his legal arguments; many published in written form after the trials had taken place. Cicero was an effective orator and a talented lawyer. This gained him public approbation when he was still quite young. Like most young Romans of means, Cicero climbed the Cursus Honorum, eventually becoming consul in 63 BC. His was the first in his family to do so, thus he was called a new man (homo novus).

Cicero, during his Consulship, was most known for his defeat of the Catilinarian rebellion. However, he also executed several Catilinarian ringleaders without trial and this led to his exile after he finished his term of office. When he returned to Italy, he was greeted as a hero. Cicero resumed his place in the Senate. He was a key influential figure during the Triumvirate of Julius Caesar, Pompey Magnus and Marcus Crassus. After Caesar’s conquest of Gaul, the death of Crassus in the East and the falling out of Pompey and Caesar, Cicero aligned himself with Pompey. After Pompey’s defeat at Pharsalus, Caesar pardoned Cicero. After Caesar’s assassination, Cicero aligned himself with Octavian against Antony in the struggle for leadership of the Caesarian  faction. It was then that he penned his Philippics, orations against Antony. These speeches would cost him his life and the lives of his brother and son when Octavian, Antony and Lepidus formed the 2nd Triumvirate against Brutus, Cassius and the Republicans. He perished during the proscriptions in 43 BC.

Cicero came to prominence as an orator and attorney in a case brought against Verres, the governor of Sicily. To hear Cicero tell it, Verres was a really bad guy. The weight of the evidence Cicero presented at trial was so great and so damning that Verres’ team didn’t even put up a defense. The disgraced former governor slunk out of Rome and into exile in Massilia. Cicero was interested in a wide variety of subjects, philosophy and rhetoric among them. He was able to “translate” Greek texts for his Latin readers. In the time of the Principate and later, his texts were required reading for young Roman students.

About The Artist, Zygmunt Michalski

Zygmunt (Zyggi) Michalski began drawing from a very young age. He studied Architecture at the Cracow University of Technology. There, he studied painting and drawing with Krystyna Wróblewska—a member of the Polish Academy of Sciences—a well-regarded painter, graphic artist, and book designer. Her work and career have appeared in academic books such as Archiwum Sztuki Polskiej XX Wieku and Tom 2 Twórczość Krystyny Wróblewskiej. She herself studied under the famous painter Ludomir Slendzinski. Michalski also studied under Professor Wiktor Zin at the Architecture Department. Dr. Zin was a widely published author and a designer of many churches internationally and in Poland. He was a well-known TV personality. Michalski worked with Zin at the Polish Studios for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Michalski is equally adept at pen and ink drawing and oil painting. He can paint in various styles and is particularly interested in the historical and surrealistic subject matter. He is also very strong in portraiture. Zygmunt Michalski has executed more than 25 pieces of art for Pro Romanis. You can see some of Zyggi’s other work at en.zmichalski.art.pl.